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Information Literacy Toolkit: URI Information Literacy Rubric

Teaching, Learning & Assessment

IL Rubric Online

Sample Scored Rubric

The instructor for this assignment chose to assess his/her students using three elements: competency in indentifying key concepts, evaluating sources, and using correct citation format. He/she assessed students' evaluation of their sources' authority and purpose.

The scores show the high number of students who are only at a beginner's level in creating citations in the correct format. This will inform the instructor that this area should be addressed in future instruction.

Other Resources

Using the URI IL Rubric

The URI Information Literacy Rubric is designed to measure student IL skills on a developmental scale - Beginning, Approaching, and Competent. Each student's work is assessed and placed in the appropriate level on this scale. The scores for each element (based on IL Standards) can then be averaged for the class to get an assessment of overall student performance in that element.

Using the rubric can be done in several ways; the process includes:

  • deciding on which IL Element(s) to assess based on the assignment's learning outcomes
  • evaluating each student's performance
  • scoring each student on the rubric
  • summarizing the total scores for the class. The total scores for each element will inform you of areas of your instruction that need attention (or not).

Refer to the IL Rubric below or use one of the links in the left column of this page.

Elements
Starting with the learning outcomes for the assignment you would like to assess, choose one or more of the Elements listed in the rubric that address your outcome(s). For example, if evaluating the resources students find for accuracy or bias is an important part of the assignment, then use Element 3 to measure student success in doing that; or if citing sources correctly is important, use the appropriate row in Element 5. [See IL for Classroom Exercises and IL for Project Assignments for more information.]

Evaluating
Use the criteria for your chosen Element(s) to decide where each student falls on the scale. If you use your own grading rubric, add the IL element(s) you are evaluating to it, or use the URI Rubric separately/in addition to yours. Evaluating students using the IL Rubric criteria will ensure a uniform campus-wide assessment of information literacy competencies.

Scoring
Scoring the rubric can be done in different ways but each student's work should be assessed by the criteria in the Element being measured and marked as such. Put a mark in the appropriate box on the rubric for each student who has achieved that level of competency. This can be done with a printed copy of the rubric, an electronic file, or a separate column or row on your normal grading rubric. (See the Sample Scored IL Rubric in the left column.)

Summarizing
Once each student's work has been evaluated and scored you can calculate a ratio for each IL Element by dividing the number of students from each level (Beginning, Approaching, and Competent) by the total number of students evaluated in each Element. The resulting percentages reflect the information literacy competency of the whole class for that Element.

Scores from multiple sections of a course, or all of the courses in a program, can be aggregated to get a wider assessment of student IL competence for programs or departments.

URI IL Rubric

URI Information Literacy (IL) Rubric

 

IL Outcomes

IL Competent

Approaches IL Competency

Beginning IL Competency

Determines the extent of information needed

 

Defines the scope of the research question, or hypothesis, or thesis effectively.

Defines the scope of the research question, or hypothesis, or thesis partially.

Defines the scope of the research question, or hypothesis, or thesis too broadly or too narrowly.

Identifies all relevant key concepts or main ideas that determine the extent of the information needed.

Identifies some relevant key concepts or main ideas that determine the extent of the information needed.

Identifies irrelevant key concepts or main ideas or does not identify any that determine the extent of the information needed.

Accesses the Needed Information

 

Accesses information using effective, well-designed search strategies and most relevant information sources.

Accesses information using simple search strategies and some relevant information sources.

Accesses information randomly, retrieves information that lacks relevance and quality.

 

Critically Evaluates Information and its Sources

*Criteria:

Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, Purpose

Selects and applies all relevant evaluation criteria of information sources.

 

o    Currency

o    Relevance

o    Authority

o    Accuracy

o    Purpose

Selects and applies some but not all of the relevant evaluation criteria of information sources.

o    Currency

o    Relevance

o    Authority

o    Accuracy

o    Purpose

Selects some evaluation criteria of information sources but selection lacks relevancy or specific application to information need.

o    Currency

o    Relevance

o    Authority

o    Accuracy

o    Purpose

Uses Information Effectively to Accomplish a Specific Purpose

Organizes, communicates, and integrates/synthesizes information from sources to fully achieve a specific purpose, with clarity and depth.

Organizes and communicates information from sources; information is not yet integrated/synthesized. The intended purpose is not fully achieved.

Communicates information from sources; information is unorganized and not integrated/synthesized. Intended purpose is not achieved.

Uses Information Ethically and Legally

 

(Understand the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published, confidential, and/or proprietary information.)

Demonstrates understanding of the difference between common knowledge and information requiring attribution most of the time.

Demonstrates an understanding of the difference between common knowledge and information requiring attribution with minor lapses.

Demonstrates a lack of understanding the difference between common knowledge and information requiring attribution.

Always includes paraphrases, summaries, and quotes in the text appropriately and accurately without distorting original intent.

 

Usually includes paraphrases, summaries, and quotes in the text appropriately and accurately without distorting original intent.

 

Does not include paraphrases, summaries, and quotes in the text appropriately and accurately without distorting original intent.

 

Uses and formats citations and references correctly.

Uses and formats citations and references correctly with minor lapses.

Uses and formats citations and references incorrectly or they are missing.

 


*From Evaluating Information – Applying the CRAAP Test, Meriam Library, California State University, Chico - www.csuchico.edu/lins/handouts/evalsites.html


Endorsed by the University of Rhode Island University Libraries, and the Office of Student Learning, Outcomes Assessment, and Accreditation, March 2013. Sponsored in part by the Davis Educational Foundation grant, 2010:  “Evidence to Initiative: Improving Student Learning through Faculty Development at the University of Rhode Island”.

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