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The Changing Face/Space of the Library: eBooks, Makerspaces, and More : eBooks in RI

Companion site to the April 29, 2014 OLIS Multi-Type Reference Advisory Group & Resource Sharing Group Joint Program.

eBooks in RI School, Academic and Public Libraries

Zach Berger -- School Libraries / RILINK (Member Services Librarian, RILINK)

Julie Kliever – Academic Libraries  (Commons Librarian for Research, Education and Collections, Providence College)

Jessica D'Avanza – Public Libraries  (chair, EZone Committee/Ocean State Libraries (OSL); Community Services Librarian, Barrington Public Library)

eBooks in RI School, Academic and Public Libraries

eBooks in RI School, Academic and Public Libraries

            Zach Berger -- School Libraries (RILINK)

            Jessica D'Avanza – Public Libraries

            Julie Kliever – Academic Libraries

 

School Libraries / RILINK

Zach Berger (Member Services Librarian, RILINK - http://www.rilink.org )

            http://guides.rilinkschools.org = LibGuides CMS for RILINK School Libraries

            Within the LibGuides system, search “ebooks” to see the variety of resources in specific schools and school systems

            Snapshot of RI School Library eBook Landscape:

            eBooks in most school districts, but not all

                        2014 - used in 160+ schools: public, private, charter

                        RICAT - Follett Destiny software

                                    customizable at the school level; matType limits

                                    www.ricat.net

                        New Horizons?

                                    eBooks - meaning for librarians :

  • more collaboration with teachers
  • more focused learning

            Conducted eBook usage survey - April-June (2013)

                        RILINK members and RIEMA members -- SURVEY

                        Who's using eBooks now?--Elementary = 37 (27%)

                                                                        Middle = 18 (50%)

                                                                        High = 12 (58%)

                        Types of eBooks

                                    Reference

                                    Nonfiction: adult and juvenile

                                    Literature: YA and Classic

                        How many eBooks? = 1 to 33K

                        (one school has ebrary subscription, but most = just a few)

                        Obstacles –   -too many choices;

                                                -no funding;

                                                -rights management: what does this mean for student use?

                                                -faculty restrictions  (i.e. students required to have physical book in class)

                        Budgeting

                        TechAccess: service needs of special users

                        Lack of interest - students vs faculty

                        Need to focus on basics

                                    – put things in hands of ALL students (no device needed)

            MARC record links - goes to interface where student must re-execute a search (not 'ease of use')

            Databases are fully searchable, so why spend $ on NonFiction /REF sources that are NOT fully searchable

            FOLLETT Shelf -eBooks, audiobooks & DataBases (single use, single checkout)

RILINK keeps statistics on eBook holdings by level of school

 

ACADEMIC Libraries

Julie Kliever  (Commons Librarian for Research, Education and Collections, Providence College)

1) eBooks at PC -    vendors = ebrary/EBSCO/Credo

                                    publishers = Wiley/GVRL

                        Platform proliferation is a problem for patrons

                                    (different user interfaces can cause frustration)

2) Individual title purchases vs packages

3) Future of eBooks: access vs ownership

            Rent everything? Why buy?

4) EBL: piloting patron driven acquisition; minus the acquisitions part (415K titles) -- own almost none currently (cost effective; browse and preview for free)-----ILL concerns

5) Short term circulations (pay per use) - pay fraction of purchase price

 

PUBLIC Libraries

Jessica D'Avanza (chair, EZone Committee/Ocean State Libraries (OSL); Community Services Librarian, Barrington Public Library)

            eZONE  (OSL) – subscribing since 2006, Overdrive (high cost);

            Overdrive media stations purchased for state-wide “tour”:

                        TouchScreen monitors will travel every couple months around state PLs; 

            Bellows Kiosk (OLIS) for discovery by potential patrons outside a library context

            Future non-library installations: airport? hospitals? malls?

                                    no usage stats can be collected at present

            Borrowing policies

                        ALL RI residents can access

                        Innovative says checkout will be able to take place through main catalog

            Includes:

                        Project Gutenberg titles

                        Featured Collections (picked by librarians);

                        Streaming Video Collections.;

                        Book Award books - Kid; Teen

                        Simultaneous users not supported in Overdrive

            40K titles in Collection (30K are eBooks)

                        Circulation up by 60% in a couple of years. 

                        EBook circulation currently =  about 10% of physical item circulation

                        Bestsellers - $85 for RandomHouse bestsellers --too much for level of use

                                    Romance, Biography, Memoir, Cooking, History = very popular

                                    Can upload local content, ie. local authors (still very small)

                        Kids page for Overdrive - safer (no Romance covers);

hand-picked by children's librarians in RI; subjects/areas too; larger covers; very colorful; platforms supported (not every one for every book)--Kindle-Overdrive-Adobe EPUB

                        HOLDS lists are long; multiple eCopies are pricey; license renewals;

                                    $13 for Penguin bestsellers (getting cheaper)

                        Requests to purchase = 45-75/week

                        January (after Christmas) busiest time for use

                                    Hachete; Macmillan will not sell to libraries

                        One copy ; one reader model is a problem

                        Lonely planet plan

                        (simultaneous users supported, but very small collection = 3 dozen titles)

                        Small collection of streaming music available

 

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