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Information Literacy Toolkit: IL Elements in a Typical Gen Ed Project Assignment

Teaching, Learning & Assessment

Information Literacy Elements

View the sample project assignment below & use the links in this box to identify parts of the assignment (highlighted in red) that correspond to the appropriate Information Literacy Rubric elements as identified in the URI General Education IL Rubric. All elements of the rubric are applied to this sample project.

Element 1.A. - Determines the scope of the information needed

Element 1.B. - Determines the relevant key concepts

Element 2 - Accesses the needed information

Element 3 - Critically evaluates information and its sources (CRAAP Test - Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, Purpose)

Element 4 - Uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose

Element 5.A. - Uses information ethically and legally - Attribution

Element 5.B. - Uses information ethically and legally - Citation

Assignment

Semester Research Project
[Example: Art History]

In no fewer than six and no more than ten written pages, using 12-point font, double spaced, select one artist and one of his/her works of art to write about. Develop a theme that relates to a wider exploration of the work that would include social, political, economic, or deeper cultural issues of significant meaning.

Successful papers will exhibit evidence of keen critical thinking supported by sound research. The paper should not be just description, nor should it present a discussion based only upon conjecture or supposition.

Include an appendix at the end of the paper of 100-150 words explaining your search process.  This should inlude an explanation of the research tools and search terms used.

In addition to the paper, create a visual presentation either in PowerPoint or Prezi format highlighting the research information that you discovered. This presentation should be no fewer than five minutes and no more than seven. Try to bring to life your paper research by using your vioce and other visual resources to summarize your main theme. Be as creative and imaginative as you can.

Paper Due Date = [... ] Submit in Sakai Assignments.

Presentation Due Date  = Last day of class.

You might explore topics such as [list examples]. Selection of a final topic will done in consultation with the instructor.

You may start by researching artists online or in the library for background information. Use encyclopedias or other library reference material and credible Web sites to help you develop a sense of the project. Keep track of new words or terms, relevant jargon of the discipline and time period.

This initial form of research is no substitute for the final project. You must show evidence that you have engaged in extensive research using substantial sources such as recognized scholarly texts, museum or gallery visitations, personal journals, photos, and/or reliable video and film interviews. Give credit to any information you use that is someone else's idea by citing the source in your Works Cited list.

Look for the following points as you begin developing your research idea:

  • Remain in sight of the origin or the original dates, people or evernts
  • Look for clear developments over time
  • Search out theories to support your stance, argument, or reason for doing your project
  • Ask who are the people or personalities involved
  • Stay aware of the problem(s) or crisis that give you reason for your inquiry.

Gather as much evidence or information as possible to support your research before starting to write a meaningful narrative.

After gathering your evidence and all of your information, do the following:

  • Organize your evidence or information
  • Analyze your informatin to see if if addresses your topic and your concerns
  • Ask if it is enough. If not, look for more to complete all views
  • Write your findings and conclusion in a meaningful narrative

Resources

There are basically two types of resources for gathering research information:

  • First-hand (primary) sources such as interviews, diaries, personal journals, eyewitness accounts, photographs, personal videos, electronic recordings and oral histories.
  • Second-hand (secondary) sources are accounts or records such as court records, legal documents, articles, magazines, books, and letters; or accours told or recorded by someone other than the person in question. Reliable electronic research materials can also be considered

List all resources in a Works Cited list at the end of the paper using MLA citation style.

Things to consider as you search for your topic:

  • Slant or bias of research information. Often writers and historians researching and recording events bring their own bias to the topic. One way to question or address bias is to look for enough pertinent examples to discover a norm from an individual voice.
  • Try not to examine your topic from a singular point of view but look for many factors that may have contributed to an event, belief, movement, or type.

Academic Integrity

From the URI Provost's office: "Students are expected to be honest in all academic work. A student’s name on any written work, quiz or exam shall be regarded as assurance that the work is the result of the student’s own independent thought and study. Work should be stated in the student’s own words, properly attributed to its source. Students have an obligation to know how to quote, paraphrase, summarize, cite and reference the work of others with integrity..."
 

Academic dishonesty, including cheating and plagiarism, will not be tolerated. Any instances of these events will be cause for failure on an assignment, project or in serious cases, for the course. The instructor will report any infractions of academic dishonesty to the appropriate College Dean. Please read the University Manual sections on Plagiarism and Cheating,  8.27.10+

http://web.uri.edu/manual/chapter-8/chapter-8-2/


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Element 1.A. Determines the scope of the information needed

 

 

Element 1a

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Element 1.B. Determines the relevant key concepts

Element 2 Accesses the Needed Information

 

Element 2

 

Element 2

 

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Element 3 Critically evaluates information and its sources

Element 4 Uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose

Element 5.A. Uses information ethically and legally - Attribution

 

Element 5b

 

Element 5a

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Element 5.B. Uses information ethically and legally - Citation

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